Southern NH

Southern NH

Haseltine

50 Austin Rd
Amherst  New Hampshire  03031
United States

Easy

70%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

15%

Description

Haseltine is a parcel of property owned by the Amherst Conservation Commission.  The land is a hilly deciduous-conifer mix forest with sections of glacial erratics.  The trail varies from double track to single track.  In places the trail is very rocky and technical while in others the trail is fast and smooth. The main trail is marked with white rectangles and is a loop. The main loop is hilly with 3 bridges, and a set of switchbacks.

The Raven trail is marked with red rectangles and travels through the middle of the main loop. The Raven trail is more challenging and offers a variety of optional drops, log rolls, and a plank. There are around 4 miles of trails at Haseltine.

Notes:
The trails are multi-use trails, so please be considerate to hikers, equestrians, and skiers, although it is rare that you will cross paths with them.  The yellow trail on the map is NOT open to bikers. Expect sections of the trail to be muddy year around. Moose, Porcupine, White-tailed Deer, Wild Turkeys and Black Bear have been spotted often in Haseltine, especially before dusk.


Directions:
Trail Head:  50 Austin Road

The best place to park is in the Haseltine Trail Head. Go to Horace Greeley Road which is 1.7 miles west of the Bedford / Amherst town line on Route 101.  Immediately turn left onto Austin Road. Go 2 miles, (passing Dodge Road on the left). The trail head is on the left, at the Tree Farm sign.
To get to the Bicentennial Trail Head, ride your bike east on Austin Road for 0.5 miles and take a right onto Dodge Road. Follow Dodge Road for 1 mile.  0.1 of a mile from the sand piles and town garage, on the right, is the trailhead for the Bicentennial Trail on the left.  Look for an opening with rocks in front.
Coordinates:     
 

Haseltine is owned by the town of Amherst and managed and maintained by the Amherst Conservation Commission.

By Peter DeSantis & Beth Woodbury
Taken from their book
Get out and Mountain Bike! Southern New Hampshire.
© Copyright 2005 Read more about Haseltine

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Southern NH

Hampstead Conservation Area

40 West Rd
Hampstead  New Hampshire  03841
United States

Easy

70%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

15%

Description

This nearly 200 acre parcel of land was originally acquired in the early 1980’s encompassing the Pickard farm and the Mathes lands. Its 12 miles of trails meander around a swamp that abuts Hog Hill Pond.

The trails are generally in very good condition. No illegal ATV use is present. There is some climbing to be had, but erosion is minimal. No big rock gardens are present and large exposed roots are few. A good half dozen bridges span the water crossings and the trails are
located in dry areas. A couple of trails have some nice rock formations nearby, including one large rock where you can practice your wheelie drops right along the trail.

Rides:

A Kiosk is located in the parking area. There are many trails not shown on the trail head map. Although the kiosk color codes these trails, they are not blazed with those colors.

The orange trail is a quick beginner loop that goes through the field to the south. The blue trails leave from the back side of that field. The trail makes a nice loop through a wooded section and is a fun ride. If you head straight from the parking area along the red trail, you should eventually come to Route 121 along the back side of the area. The terrain is mostly rolling hills, with some short technical sections.

The trails to the left of the main trail, which are not on the kiosk map, are some of the most entertaining. The first left takes you back to West Road where you can cross it for a small fast loop. The second left (along a stone wall) gets you into some real fun. It covers a wider selection of terrain and different rock formations. Take time to explore…. you can’t really get lost.

You can also cross West Road (at Governors Island Road) for a very fast ride down some old logging roads, also suited for beginners.

Directions:
40 West Rd is located off of Route 111 on the western side of Hampstead. Parking is 0.5 mile up West road, on the right.


Owned/Managed: Town of Hampstead

Maintained by: Hampstead Conservation Commission

By Peter DeSantis & Beth Woodbury
Taken from their book
Get Out and Mountain Bike! Southern New Hampshire.
© Copyright 2005 Read more about Hampstead Conservation Area

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Southern NH

Grater Woods & Pond Parish

15 Grater Rd
Amherst  New Hampshire  03054
United States

Easy

70%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

15%

Description

Grater Woods and Pond Parish are two large parcels of land that are owned by the town’s conservation commissions.  Grater Woods is a 600-acre parcel located in Merrimack and abuts Pond Parish, which is a 174-acre parcel in Amherst.  These trails systems offer a wide variety of fun and challenges.  The trails range from rocky double ATV trails or twisty single track. There are 20+ miles of trails to be ridden.

Pond Parish is riddled with large wetlands and for most of the year there is guaranteed mud.  Along with the water and mud come bugs.  This is not the best place to ride in May unless you want the black flies and mosquitoes to help you ride faster. 

From the back of the Grater Rd parking lot turn right onto the trail and descend the rocky hill to get to Pond Parish.  Pond Parish is a fast single-track loop with little technical challenge.  This is a great place to ride fast. Once completed enjoy the leg-burning climb back to Grater Road.  At the end of Grater Road the trail to Grater Woods is on the left.  Grater Woods is riddled with singletrack and wide logging roads.  The New England Mountain Biking Association built a lot of new single track in Grater Woods over the last few years.  Be sure to study or bring the map with the surrounding roads if you want to explore.  There are many more trails than what the map shows. 


Owned, managed and maintained by the towns of Merrimack and Amherst's Conservation Commissions and Southern NH NEMBA

Directions and parking:
15 Grater Road, Amherst NH
From Route 101 take the Route 122 exit for Amherst.  Turn onto Baboosic Lake Road and follow for about 5 miles. Grater Road will be on your right.

Or for a large group ride-

Merrimack Middle School at the end of Madeline Bennett Drive, Merrimack.

There are also smaller cul-de-sac lots on Beebe Lane and Conservation Drive in Merrimack.

  Read more about Grater Woods & Pond Parish

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Southern NH

Foster's Pond Natural Area

50 Nashua Rd
Windham  New Hampshire  03087
United States

Easy

95%

Moderate

5%

Difficult

0%

Description

This area is comprised of 190 acres of conservation land. Two main trails lead to the pond. The Pond East Trail is blazed in yellow. The blue blazed path is called the Nancy Johnson Trail and leads you to the Pond West Trail meeting at the back side of the pond. All of the trails have rocks and exposed roots through out. Numerous wet areas are crossed by utilizing a variety of bridge types. Quite unique! There is also a portion of a former rail bed that runs by the parking area. You can go west for 0.75 miles before it ends. Heading east, it ends at Route I-93 in about 1.5 miles. Spring and summer have an abundance of insects! There are about 5 miles of enjoyable trails at Foster's Pond.

Directions
50 Nashua Road.
Route 93 Exit 3. West on Route 111. At the second set of lights, turn right onto North Lowell Road. Go 1.2 miles and turn left onto Londonderry Road. Continue 1.2 miles and turn left onto Nashua Road. Go 0.4 miles and park in the second lot, near the basketball courts.


Owned/Managed: Town of Windham

Maintained by: Windham Conservation Commission     

By Peter DeSantis & Beth Woodbury
Taken from their book
Get Out and Mountain Bike! Southern New Hampshire.
© Copyright 2005 Read more about Foster's Pond Natural Area

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Southern NH

Fort Rock

50 Newfields Rd
Exeter  New Hampshire  03833
United States

Easy

20%

Moderate

40%

Difficult

40%

Description

Location:

Exeter & Newfields, NH

 

Fort Rock is the commonly known name for two separate Town Forests, the Henderson-Swasey Town Forest in Exeter and the Oakland Town Forest in Newfields. They are separated by Route 101. Joining them together is a large metal culvert that runs under the highway.

The trails here offer almost unlimited technical challenges to the rider who's willing to work a bit. It's almost impossible to ride here without dodging or climbing over a plethora of exposed rocks and roots. And the trip under Route 101 is almost unique in all of New England's riding.

Riding at Fort Rock is challenging. There are too many trails to ride in one outing, so expect to come back if you want to explore everything.

Of the two properties, Oakland Hills seems to offer the most technical challenge. While Henderson-Swasey has the majority of the more mellow trails.

Henderson-Swasey has some smooth rolling old woods roads. Many of the singletracks leading off of these are quite technical. There is a short graded dirt road and a long gas line that's located near the main parking lot and they offer the mellowest riding on the property.

From the parking area at Oakland Hills you head down a long old woods road that's turning into a singletrack. Branching off from it you'll find lots of well used singletracks and degraded forests roads. Many of these are very challenging.
   
While both properties abut each other and are only separated by a highway I find them to be quite a bit different. I prefer Henderson-Swasey when I want a ride that's composed of a variety of riding experiences. Oakland Hills is my choice when I want to beat myself up more consistently on challenging terrain.

The trails leading from both properties to the culvert are quite difficult, and most people will find themselves getting off and walking at least once.

Directions:


From Route 101 that the Route 85 Exit. The entrance to Henderson-Swasey is located a quarter of a mile to the south. The parking area for Oakland Hills is a quarter of a mile to the north.

Cautions:


There are a lot of trails here and it's easy to get lost. Bring copies of the maps when you ride, and if you're hopelessly lost, try listening for the traffic on Route 101.

By Bill Boles Read more about Fort Rock

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Southern NH

Lake Massabesic, FOMBA Trails

57 Depot Rd
Auburn  New Hampshire  03032
United States

Easy

30%

Moderate

40%

Difficult

20%

Description

The Lake Massabesic Watershed hosts one of the best mountain bike trail systems anywhere. It includes more than 13 miles of singletrack trails that were built and which are maintained by FOMBA, The Friends of Massabesic Bicycling Association. The singletracks are technical and wind through the woods in a manner that would be very confusing for a non-cyclist. But on a bike, everything makes sense as one singletrack trail leads naturally to another with only a short fireroad break to separate them. And speaking of the fireroads, there are over 20 miles of them. They're much easier going than the singletracks and are perfect for just buzzing around when you don't want to challenge yourself too strenuously. There's also a long section of abandoned railroad bed that's now a rail trail. The latter is perfect for families with young kids on small singlespeed bicycles.

FOMBA originated in 1995 when the sport of mountain biking was younger and there was a possibility that the area would be closed to bikes. The organization has done a lot more over the years than just insure that mountain biking is welcome. They run an annual benefit fun ride for the Auburn Volunteer Rescue Squad and have been involved in promoting charity cyclecross races. And, of course, they are the stewards of Massabesic's singletracks. The first fun ride in 1995 had 12 participants. The second had 15. But that's changed. 2006 saw a record turnout of 295 and it's been around that number ever since.

I wish that I lived closer to Manchester NH. If I did, FOMBA's trails would be in my back yard - instead of a long drive away. But then, maybe that's one of the reasons why I like these trails so much. Since I can't get there too often, they'll never seem old to me. Then again, mountain bikers designed these singletracks for mountain bikes. They were built with longevity in mind. IE: They're hardened and won't degrade over time. But most of all they're a blast to ride. Winding as they do in and around an endless succession of rocks, roots, trees and small hills. At times you almost think that you're riding the same trail backwards. They're that convoluted. And if you're riding the trails with a number of riders, you'll frequently see them a few yards off in the woods, on their own portion of the trail that you're riding on. And unlike most trails, with these singletracks, it doesn't matter which way you ride them. They're equally fun in both directions and they'll seem totally different when you ride them 'backwards'.

Try FOMBA's trails once and you'll be addicted. I was, I am - Even though I live too far away to get my "fix" more than once or twice a year.

Check with FOMBA to see when the enxt TrailCare day is.


Directions:
From route 93 north or south take exit 7 and head East on route 101. Take exit 2 off of route 101 and head south on Hookset Rd. Take your second left on Depot Rd about 1000 feet after you cross a railroad bed. Head north until you see a parking area on your right. Unload your bikes - and explore. Oh! Be sure to bring the map with you. Otherwise you'll get lost.

Alternatively, take exit 1 from route 101 and head South on route 28. Just after the rotary you'll see a large parking lot on your left. That's the front parking lot for Lake Massabesic. Head out of the parking area on the trail at the north of this lot and you'll connect up with the rail trail that will lead you to the depot Road parking area.

Cautions:

FOMBA's trails are closed when conditions are such that the trails would be damaged by use. For example: In the early spring during the mud season. Check with FOMBA if you're unsure.

Submitted by Bill Boles Read more about Lake Massabesic, FOMBA Trails

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Southern NH

College Woods

1 Colovos Rd
Durham  New Hampshire  03824
United States

Easy

80%

Moderate

18%

Difficult

2%

Description

Location:
University of New Hampshire, Durham NH

College Woods is a property of The University of New Hampshire. Its 250 acres were donated to the university in 1891 and originally provided the school with a ready source of lumber for the construction of many of the campus' older buildings. More recently a portion of the "Woods" has been preserved as a natural sturdy area.

The trails in College Woods are very well maintained. They are mostly flat and are non-technical in nature.

Riding in College Woods is a really fun experience, perfect on a hot sweaty summer day when the cool of the woods will provide you with a refreshing breeze as you ride beneath the dense forest cover. You'll find miles of rolling woods roads; some mostly smooth singletracks and you'll see lots of people out on the trails. Expect to loop around a lot. There are about 9 miles of trails, but to explore them all you'll have to do a lot of repeats.

The main water supply for the UNH campus is located in a dammed section of the Oyster River. A trail runs beside this reservoir and a newly constructed wooden bridge crosses it.

Directions:
From route 4 take Route 155A south towards Durham/UNH.  Go right on College Road after 1.2 miles. Turn right on Colovos Road, go under the bridge and turn left. Park at the trailhead at the Waterworks Road intersection.

Cautions:
You will see a lot of people out on these trails. And a lot of unleashed dogs. Slow down, or stop, and say "Hi!".

By Bill Boles Read more about College Woods

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Southern NH

Bicentennial Trail & Hemlock Trail Loop

50 Austin Rd
Amherst  New Hampshire  03031
United States

Easy

70%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

15%

Description

The Bicentennial Trail, of which portions have been in existence for the last 50 years, offers a challenge for even the most advanced riders.  The first part of the trail follows Dodge road offering advanced beginner / intermediate terrain.  After crossing Austin Road, the Bicentennial Trail should be ridden only by advanced and experienced riders. The trail is mostly single track with rocks, roots and hills.  The Bicentennial Trail intersects the Hemlock Trail in Joe English Reservation. The Hemlock Trail allows for a loop and then you must follow the Bicentennial Trail back to Austin Road.  The Hemlock Trail follows the ridgeline as single track and depending on the direction you choose to go you will climb a double track or have a very fast double track decent. Taken together there are about 12 miles of trails.


Rides:
Bicentennial Trail to Austin Road – Intermediate
Bicentennial Trail & Hemlock Trail Loop – Advanced


Notes:
The Hemlock Trail is the only trail in Joe English Reservation accessible to bikes.  Please obey this or mountain bikes will be excluded from the reserve all together.   If you wish to only ride the first part of the Bicentennial trail then you can take a left onto Austin Road, instead of crossing the road, and ride 0.5 miles up the road to the Haseltine parking lot.

Directions:
Trail Head:  50 Austin Road

The best place to park is in the parking area for the Haseltine Trail Head. Go to Horace Greeley Road which is 1.7 miles west of the Bedford / Amherst town line on Route 101.  Immediately turn left onto Austin Road. Go 2 miles, (passing Dodge Road on the left). The trail head is on the left, at the Tree Farm sign.
To get to the Bicentennial Trail Head, ride your bike east on Austin Road for 0.5 miles and take a right onto Dodge Road. Follow Dodge Road for 1 mile.  0.1 of a mile from the sand piles and town garage, on the right, is the trailhead for the Bicentennial Trail on the left.  Look for an opening with rocks in front.

This land is owned by the town of Amherst and managed and maintained by the Amherst Conservation Commission

 

By Peter DeSantis & Beth Woodbury
Taken from their book
Get out and Mountain Bike! Southern New Hampshire.
© Copyright 2005 Read more about Bicentennial Trail & Hemlock Trail Loop

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Southern NH

Bear Brook State Park

157 Deerfield Rd
Allenstown  New Hampshire  03275
United States

603-485-9869

Easy

35%

Moderate

35%

Difficult

30%

Description

Bear Brook State Park consists of nearly 10,000 acres and is the largest developed state park in NH. Amenities include swimming, camping, fishing and group picnic areas. It's 40 miles of trails accommodate biking, hiking, horse back riding and include x-country skiing and snowmobiling in the winter. The park was the site of the original town of Allenstown. In the late 1800's, the park area had been completely logged to supply the mills in the Suncook area. The population shifted to the western part of the town and in 1935, Bear Brook was selected for development as a recreational demonstration area. At that time, almost 25% of the New Hampshire population lived within a 15-mile radius. The Civilian Conservation Corps, in the mid to late 1930's, built many of the park structures you see today. As you travel the park, you will notice many remnants of the old town; stone foundations, cemeteries and dams are scattered through out.

The riding here can accommodate all abilities. Trails consist of dirt roads, double track, single track as well as numerous natural features for extra fun. This is what makes Bear Brook a great time. You can ride easy on Podunk road or push yourself to the limit on Catamount Hill.

 


Rides:

Beginner Loop:      6 Miles
From the parking lot, go back up the hill you drove in on, to the paved road. Go straight across and take the snowmobile trail on the left. Bear left at the “Y” intersection and follow the Pitch Pine Trail (crossing the snowmobile trail once) until you come to the archery range and the fishing pond.

Head out towards the road and take a left onto the snowmobile trail just before the paved road (which leads to the campground). Follow this trail, which runs parallel to the paved road, and take the second trail on the right.  Follow 50 yards to the paved road. When you come to the paved road, bear right and cross it and continue on the Pitch Pine Trail. At the junction of Broken Boulder Trail turn left. Shortly, there is a wide trail on the right which circles over to the Smith Pond Shelter. Take a look! Rejoin Broken Boulder Trail until the next trail junction, appearing on the right.

This is Bobcat Trail which you will follow all the way to Podunk Road across from Hayes Field.
At this point you have two options; the easiest way is to go down Podunk Road back to the parking lot, the second way, which is more challenging, is to take Little Bear from Hayes Field.

So, if you choose Little Bear, enter the field and take the trail on the right just after the outhouses. When you get to the dirt road, cross it and pass by the gate and take the trail on the right. Keep left at the top of the small hill and follow the trail to the end. (CAUTION…the trail can get very fast going downhill!)
Ignore the trail on the left at the bottom of the big downhill… keep right. Take a left on the road (One Mile Trail) and a right back to the parking lot.


Intermediate Loop:    14 Miles
Follow the beginner loop ride description until you reach the junction of Broken Boulder and Bobcat (marked with +++++). At this point, continue on Broken Boulder. At the paved road, you must go left for a hundred yards (passing the “broken boulder”) before the trail continues on the right. Follow to the end.
Now turn right onto Podunk Road (dirt) and follow to the intersection where the road to the 4-H camp begins.
Continue down Podunk for a couple of hundred yards and catch Ferret Trail on the left. Follow Ferret and pass the Bear Hill Summit trail on the right. Go down hill and there will be a path shortly on the left to Bear Pond (small sign). Stop for lunch and a swim. It is one of the best spots in the park! 


Back out turning left on Ferret. Shortly Hedgehog Ledge will appear on the right. Follow this trail to the end. (CAUTION…this trail has some very technical granite steps. Extreme care should be taken! The first set comes up quickly after you leave the area that was logged and begin to head downhill.)

After the trail levels out, you want to go right at the “T” intersection and soon will go through an open area they used for staging logs. You will come to Podunk Road again. (The park map shows the Bear Hill Trail intersecting Hedgehog, but it does not. It comes out on Podunk Road).


Turn left on Podunk and go to Hayes Field.Head into the field and go to the far end. Turn left onto Carr Ridge (no sign) through another section recently


logged. Continue straight on Carr Ridge crossing Hayes Farm Trail and Sentinel Pine.
Continue on Carr Ridge for a couple of miles. You will come to some steep downhill, washed out sections. At
the bottom of these Carr Ridge ends and meets Cascade.
####


Go right on Cascade to the end. At the bottom, there are a set of log stairs that are rideable but challenging. Go easy on the front brake!
******


Directly across from the stairs is Bear Brook trail. This section of trail is usually wet and best avoided by turning right, after going down the stairs and catching the trail about 200 yards on the left, just before the road turns right and goes up a hill.


Follow the trail and bear right at the brook. Do not cross the brook on that nasty looking pallet bridge. You will ride the side slope of the hill on some benched trail. Follow to the end.
Turn left onto the road and a quick right back to the parking area.

Advanced Loop:    17 Miles
Follow the intermediate loop ride description until you get to the junction of Carr Ridge and Cascade (marked with ####).Take a left on Cascade and follow the left side of the brook. When you come to a log bridge, cross it and continue up the hill to the next intersection. (The trail sign will say “Catamount Hill Trail” although other places it refers to “Cascade Trail”).


At the junction of Sentinel Pine, continue straight and follow to the next “T” intersection.
Cascade continues to the left to the summit of Catamount Hill. (The trail to the right is Short Cut. If you want to bail, take this trail back down to One Mile Trail and turn right). There is a short hike a bike section with lots of rock and boulders.


At the top, the trail continues to the right. It crosses over some granite slabs for a bit and then heads down. Use extreme caution! There are a few steep rocky sections. Go to the end, ignoring a trail intersection, along the smooth downhill section.


Turn right on to One Mile Trail (a dirt road). When you get to the log stairs on the right (Cascade Trail), follow the directions for the intermediate ride (marked with ******)

Another good intermediate ride starts from the hiker / biker parking lot. Some of the trails in this area are a lot of fun. Head over to Pitch Pine, Saltlick and Bobcat for a nice warm up Rolling double track will get the blood flowing. Continue over to Broken Boulder to step things up a bit. A little climbing never hurt anyone. Increase your output while you get those legs burning as you climb Bear Hill. Watch out for the red ant hills! On a hot day, a ride down Ferret to Bear Pond for a quick secluded swim is always refreshing. Get back in the groove with a fast trip down Hedgehog Ledge. The granite steps will gets the heart pumping. From Hayes Field, Carr Ridge brings you through the heart of the park. This rolling single track highlights what is best about the area. Natural rock features and a quick surface will test your skills. Heading back via the Bear Brook Trail takes advantage of previous trail work along the river. Nice benched trail shows what good trail work can produce. Finish your ride with a scream. Heading down Little Bear back to the parking lot, will always leave a smile on your face.

Directions:

The "Mountain Bike" parking lot is up Podunk Rd. Allentown on the right.

From I-93:
Exit 9N onto Route 3/28 North and follow signs to Bear Brook State Park.

From I-95:
Route 4 West to Route 28 South and follow signs to Bear Brook State Park.

This ride is adapted from "Get out and Mountain Bike! Southern New Hampshire".
© Copyright 2005
By Peter DeSantis & Beth Woodbury
  Read more about Bear Brook State Park

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Kona Bicycles MTB Adventure Ride at Bear Brook State Park

Date

10/5/14 10:00am to 4:00pm

Come join the Southern New Hampshire chapter of NEMBA for the fun, while helping to save the trails in Bear Brook State Park!   There will be a one-mile kids/family loop,a 6-mile beginner loop, a 10-13 mile intermediate loop, and a 20-25 mile advanced loop.  Ride fast or just cruise, the trails are arrowed so everyone knows where to go and you don’t have to worry about getting lost!

All the money raised by the Boogie goes directly to the park to rebuild and maintain the trails.

Riders can follow marked courses on their own at any time or take part in a led ride.

Led rides:  We'll have a beginner ride of about 6 miles, an intermediate about 12 miles, and an advanced about 25 miles.  All rides leave at 10 AM.

-There won't be any led family rides.

Cost: $10.00 for NEMBA members, $25.00 for non-members and FREE for anyone
who joins NEMBA at the event - Kids 15 and Under Ride free with a registered parent or Guardian

Bear Brook State Park, located in Allenstown NH, offers over 30 miles of mountain biking trails from mellow woods roads to challenging single track.  In addition, the park offers camping (May – October) and a beach/swimming area.  Come explore the park while helping a good cause.  It’s a great way to spend the day and it’s a great place to ride!

Camping

Bear Brook has a wonderful campground, so come and make a weekend out of it! For reservations call 877-647-2757.  For more info on camping.

Directions:

157 Deerfield Road, Allenstown, NH 03275 (look for Snowmobile Parking Lot)

MORE INFO: http://www.mtbadventureseries.org/mtbadventure/BearBrook.htm

  Read more about Kona Bicycles MTB Adventure Ride at Bear Brook State Park

Location

Bear Brook State Park

Chapter

Southern NH

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