Southeast MA

Southeast MA

Shawme-Crowell State Forest

42 Main St
Sandwich  Massachusetts  02563
United States

508 888-0351

Easy

30%

Moderate

60%

Difficult

10%

Description

Shawme Crowell is a 700 acre State Forest located in the town of Sandwich just over the Cape Cod Canal on the Cape. The park is best know for it's campground. There are almost 300 well maintained campsites. The Forest has about 5 miles of paved and dirt roads and about 10 miles of trails. The trails are very well maintained and trail markers abound. These trails are, as a rule, not very technical. There are a couple of steep climbs, but mostly the trails are rolling in nature, fast and a lot of fun to ride. Get a map at the Forest's Welcome Station and you won't get lost.

 

The best place to access the trails is at the back of the forest near the camper's dumping station. From there you will see one trail heading off into the woods, another right behind the utility shed and a third a short distance away across a clearing. I suggest starting with the one across the clearing. Expect to enjoy yourself here. A good rider could cover all of the Forest's trails in a couple of hours, but with one or two exceptions they are just as much fun in both directions.

 

There are a lot of deer in the forest, and the State has installed a tick killer / deer feed station, to limit them.

 

Notes:
Be sure to check yourself for ticks after every ride. You may find that some passengers have adhered to your clothing.

 

Directions:
From the Cape Cod Canal Follow Rte. 6 over the Sagamore bridge to exit 2 and the intersection with Rte. 130 in Sandwich. Follow Rte. 130 into Sandwich and follow the State Forest signs 3 miles to the Forest entrance which will be on your left.

 

By Bill Boles Read more about Shawme-Crowell State Forest

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Southeast MA

Rocky Woods, Taunton

1 Range Avenue
Taunton  Massachusetts  02780
United States

Easy

20%

Moderate

50%

Difficult

30%

Description

Rocky Woods in Taunton has over 30 miles of tight, twisty fairly technical singletrack. There are far too many trails to ride in one day. Some of the trails can be muddy and a few are overgrown with vegetation. But in many places local trail advocates have built wooden bridges to get you through the mud. You can ride here all year long save for the early spring when many of the trails will be too muddy. Rocky Woods is also home to some good rock climbing.

It would be very easy to get lost in Rocky Woods but fortunately many of the trails are marked. And by following the colored markers you'll get a good introduction to the area. While most of the trails are singletracks you'll find a few old woods roads too. If you follow them out to local streets you'll get an idea of just how big this area is. Expect to spend more than a few days finding all the trails here. And bring a copy of this map. It will help a lot.

The singletracks here were in large part made by motorcyclists. Expect to see them out on the trails.

Directions:
From Taunton Center head west on route 44. You can park behind Curley's Pub. This is about a quarter of a mile past North Walker Street on route 44. The trailhead is behind the building next to the dumpster.

But I usually park at the bowling alley about one quarter of a mile beyond Curley's at the corner of Range Ave. To get to the trails from there head up Range Ave and turn right on Rocky Woods Street. (A degrading dirt road that looks like a trail.)

By Bill Boles Read more about Rocky Woods, Taunton

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Southeast MA

Rocky Gutter

34 Rocky Gutter St
Middleborough  Massachusetts  02346
United States

(508) 759-3406

Easy

80%

Moderate

15%

Difficult

5%

Description

At last a place to ride that isn't hard.    At last a place to ride that doesn't have any hills.

Rocky Gutter Wildlife Management Area is located in Middleborough just off route 495. The area consists of 2954 acres and is managed by the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. This land is managed for hunting fishing and wildlife viewing and there are over 15 miles of trails and dirt roads that can be enjoyed on a mountain bike.

As I stated above the riding here is pretty easy. This is a perfect place to ride if you don't want to beat yourself up, if you are introducing a new rider to the sport, or are riding with your kids.

From the parking area near the metal gate I'd suggest following Rocky Gutter Road to the far end of the park. (About 2.2 miles.) If you do you'll notice many trails and old woods roads leading off Rocky Gutter Road to the north and south. A good rule of thumb here is that any trail that looks used probably loops back to Rocky Gutter Road at some point. While any trail that doesn't look used probably dead ends someplace. Most of the best riding is located on the north side of the road. (That's your left as you ride out of the parking area.) The south side is much larger, but it has fewer trails as it's mostly a wetland.

One good ride consists of riding to the far end of the park and then on your way back taking your first right into the woods on a well used doubletrack. From this point if you keep taking left turns you'll eventually get back to Rocky Gutter Road much closer to your car. As you do this you'll notice a number of well used right turns leading off into the woods. Take them and you be extending your ride with additional loops.

The most difficult trail that I found was on the South side of the road not too far past the management area's only powerline. Follow it and you'll eventually come to an old ATV trail that leads out of the management area. But, this trail does not lead back to the main road. So if you ride it you'll be doing it as an "out & back".

One thing that strikes me every time I ride here is the solitude. I have never seen anyone out on the trails. Or even on the dirt road. Another thing is the quite. Stay on the north side of Rocky Gutter Road and you won't hear any traffic noise from Route 495 or anyplace else. And jet planes rarely fly over. You almost get the impression that you're riding someplace in northern New England so remote seeming is this area.

As I said all levels of riders can enjoy most of the park's trails. None require any advanced skills or high levels of fitness. Better riders of course will cover ground faster. But unless they're intent on riding challenging terrain even very good riders will have a lot of fun here too.

Directions:

From the north or south take Route 495 to exit 3. Head north on Route 28. Take your first right on Miller Street. And then turn right on Rocky Gutter Street. The paved road will turn into a dirt road and right before a metal gate you'll see a parking area on your right.

Cautions:
Rocky Gutter Wildlife Management Area is managed primarily for hunting and fishing. So during hunting season there will be a lot of hunters there. I would suggest not riding here during hunting season. After all you'll have the trails to yourself for most of the rest of the year. Massachusetts Hunting Season (There's no hunting in Massachusetts on Sundays.)

By Bill Boles Read more about Rocky Gutter

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Southeast MA

Pratt Farm

110 East Main St
Middleboro  Massachusetts  02346
United States

Easy

50%

Moderate

40%

Difficult

10%

Description

Pratt Farm has been a town owned conservation area since 1986. It is trail dense for such a small area. It boasts excellent trails for beginners, and has enough singletracks to keep most riders happy. In all there are probably 8 miles of trail in Pratt Farm. And more nearby that you'll discover as you explore. Though you'll have to spend a bit of time here to find everything.

Some of the trails are smooth and easy to ride. But many are root laden and force you to keep your eyes on the trail and not on the surrounding woods. That's too bad as Pratt farm has some very scenic hardwood forest stands and a few small ponds and streams that abound with wildlife.

One of my favorite trails is the "roller coaster" it starts at the top of a small hill, and if you let yourself go fast enough you can clear the uphill that follows without pedaling. You'll know it when you see it.

In the central part of the farm there's an obscure singletrack. It's pretty hard to find in the fall after the leaves have dropped off the trees. But it winds around and over the farm's only hill. It's probably the farm's most technical trail as it's narrow, somewhat overgrown and has plenty of fallen trees to overcome. The key to finding it is to go to the top of the farm's biggest hill on an old woods road. When you're there the singletrack will be right in front of you going left and right.

For an introduction to Pratt Farm's trails leave the parking area and at the first intersection turn left and follow the loop marked out with red trail markers. This will give you a good introduction to the area and on your second loop try exploring the many side trails that you found the first time around. I always enjoy my rides at pratt farm. Although I don't spend a lot of time here the trails keep calling me back.

              For a dog's impression of Pratt Farm go here.

The Middleboro Conservation Commission welcomes bikes. But they do request that everyone joins in a common effort to maintain the trails. To that end I always ride here with a small folding saw and hand lopper. That way I'm able to clear most of the deadfalls and overgrowth that I encounter.

Directions:
From route 24 in Middleborough take the route 44 exit and head East.
              Turn right on route 105, East Main Street, heading towards Middleborough center. Continue 1 mile to the parking lot on your left.

Cautions:
Lots of pedestrians use this area. Especially on weekends. Use cautiion, keep your speed down and we'll always be welcome here. By late spring you will find a lot of poison ivy growing near the old mill site. Use caution or avoid that trail.

By Bill Boles Read more about Pratt Farm

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Southeast MA

Myles Standish State Forest

222 3 Cornered Pond Rd
plymouth  Massachusetts  02360
United States

508 866-2526

Easy

50%

Moderate

40%

Difficult

10%

Description

Sprawling across the southern sections of Plymouth and Carver, Myles Standish State Forest is the largest publicly owned recreation area in southeastern Massachusetts. MSSF offers five camping areas, tucked into the forest or set along the edges of four of the park's 16 ponds.

All are beautifully maintained and a section of the Charge Pond area is set aside specifically for horse camping. Two day-use areas offer picnicking, swimming, fishing, canoeing, miles of paved bicycle trails, 35 miles of equestrian trails and 13 miles of hiking trails take visitors deep into the forest, which includes one of the largest contiguous pitch pine/scrub oak communities north of Long Island.


The forest's 14,635 acres are laced with hundreds of miles of trails, paths, fire breaks, paved roads and dirt roads. Some of the pathways in the forest actually predate the Pilgrims. There's also a 22 mile paved bicycle trail.

Mountain bikes can ride anywhere in the forest except on pond shores. Particularly attractive are the busy bicycle trail and the 28 mile horse trail. There is a very popular 6 mile marked singletrack loop that begins in the forest's central parking lot.

The horse trail is currently 28 miles long. A few of its trails are composed of loose sand but most are great for mountain bikes.

The forest's trails can form an endless number of rides. Maps showing the forest's extensive trail system, including many of the roads and trails that are not part of any trail system are available at forest headquarters. But, there are mny more trails than those shown on any published map.

Riding opportunities in the Myles Standish State Forest, range from wonderfully deserted smooth forest roads to endless doubletracks, to barely defined singletracks and game trails where you'll spend a good part of your time walking. You can expect lots of Pitch Pine and Scrub Oak, small hills, sand, a little mud and no rocks. Some of the forest's trails may convince you that you are riding in the "Miles of Sandish State Forest." With a little experience though, you'll soon learn to avoid them. Most of the trails are quite ridable and lots of fun.

The paved bicycle trail follows natural terrain and runs all through the forest. This makes it a fine reference point for traffic-free forest exploration. It's also good for short cutting the longer off-road sections.

A couple of cautions.... Get off the trail whenever you hear a motorcycle coming. Motorcycle riders go very fast and they don't expect others to be out on the trails. Currently Myles Standish's trails are closed to motorcycles and ATVs but you may see some. Bring lots of water. There is no potable water available except in campgrounds and at forest headquarters. You might consider riding the marked trails until you become familiar with the layout of the forest. Always carry a map. Nearly 15,000 acres, surrounded by a lot of other open space, can make it very easy to get lost.

Myles Standish State Forest is great in the winter due to a normal lack of snow and an abundance of frozen sand. Which almost seems to turn the "Miles of Sandish" sections into pavement.

It's a good place to ride in the early spring during the "mud season" as the generally sandy/gravelly upper Cape soil tends to dry out first. In warmer weather there are over 600 campsites, many on lakes where you can swim.

Myles Standish State Forest has become the destination of choice for winter riding in Southeastern MA.

When the snow is deep, the only riding is on packed snowmobile trails which support bikes quite nicely. Studded tires are optional. On mixed snow/dirt/ice conditions, studs are nice and the only places where riding is difficult to impossible are where the snow has drifted and not been packed down by snowmobiles.

But, most of the time in the winter there is no snow in Myles Standish. In a normal winter, the usually sandy conditions that occur on about 15% of the trails and make them less than optimal in the summer, are gone and the sand is frozen hard. Which makes for good riding everywhere.
                       
Directions:
Myles Standish State Forest is located in southeastern Massachusetts.

From the north: Take Rte. 3 south to exit 5, turn right onto Long Pond Rd. (west) and continue for about 3 miles to the park entrance on the right.

From Rte. 495: Take Rte. 495 to exit 2 (South Carver) and the intersection with Rte. 58. Take Rte. 58 north on Cranberry Rd., follow signs.
             
The central trails parking lot is located at the junctions of 3 cornered Pond and Upper College Pond Roads.

Rules:
All trails are closed during Deer week, on a few Saturdays, and on all holidays during hunting season.  Check with the DCR for hunting dates.

By Bill Boles Read more about Myles Standish State Forest

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Southeast MA

Massasoit State Park

1 Massasoit Park Rd
Taunton  Massachusetts  02718
United States

(508) 644-5522

Easy

40%

Moderate

40%

Difficult

20%

Description

Massasoit State Park is located just a few minutes from route 495 in Taunton, Massachusetts. It's densely forested and has a lot of trails. Massasoit has one lake and three ponds. There is a campground with over 120 sites and a public beach. Although, in 2009, the campground was closed while much needed repairs to its electrical system were made. Massasoit has a parking lot for equestrians in the southern end of the park, but most people choose to park near the main entrance off Middleboro Ave. The park is well utilized by mountain bikers. It’s rare to go there and not see at least a few cars with bicycle racks parked in the lot. Local shops have held weekly rides there for years and Massasoit has seen more than a few mountain bike races.  Note: Due to budget constraints the park became unstaffed in 2011. You can still use it, but don't expect to see many DCR staff people there.

I ride at Massasoit all year long except when deep snow makes the trails impassable. There are a wide variety of trails at Massasoit. Grab a map at the entrance station or print one from the DCR’s website.  Many of the park’s best singletracks are not on the map, but with it, you’ll know where you are and you can use it as a good guide to find everything. There are about 15 miles of trails at Massasoit, including a few miles of dirt roads. The park also has a few miles of paved road leading into and around the campground. There are a few miles of fairly mellow trails suitable for families, especially if you use the paved road as a connector. There are no long extended climbs at Massasoit but on many singletracks you'll encounter a number of short steep hills. These are made more difficult by exposed roots and are sure to make your heart rate climb. The trails are fairly busy. You’ll be dealing with gravel, roots, rocks, a little sand and many tight corners. Most of the trails are not overly technical and many are rolling singletrack. SInce the park 'closed' in 2011 many of the trails are starting to become overgrown.  We always ride with a small folding saw and a hand held lopper. Why not do the same and help keep Massasoit's trails open and fun? Expect to find a few difficult trails, though these are not hairy enough to make a long travel full suspension bike necessary. It will take a good rider at least a couple of days to thoroughly explore Massasoit.

To get your explorations started check out this GPS ride map. This 11 mile route, highlights many of Massasoit’s best trails and is a great ride in either direction. There are many more miles of trails to explore beyond this route.

Massasoit lies right on the line between the sandy gravely soil of the Cape Cod area and the more rocky earth of northern Plymouth and Bristol counties. As a result the trails drain quickly, and the spring's mud season is very short. A good rule of thumb is, don’t ride here if you wouldn’t ride around on your lawn.

All levels of riders can ride most of the park's trails, but a few do require some advanced skills. It may take you a while to explore all of the park's trails. After all 1500 acres is a lot, but it will be time well spent.
                
Directions:
From the north or south: Take Rte. 495 to Exit 5 in Middleborough. Take Rte. 18 South to the first intersection where there is a yellow flashing light. Turn right onto Taunton Street which becomes Middleborough Ave. Follow signs to the park.
From Boston: Take Rte. 24 south to Rte. 44 east, follow signs.

Cautions:
Be careful when riding near the main trailhead. Massasoit’s trails are very popular and are used by numerous walkers as well as by mountain bikers. You may encounter families with kids and dogs, slow down when you do as kids and dogs are very curious. Also, yield to equestrians when you see them.

By Bill Boles Read more about Massasoit State Park

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Southeast MA

Lansing Bennet Forest

630 Massachusetts 53
Duxbury  Massachusetts  02332
United States

Easy

80%

Moderate

19%

Difficult

1%

Description

The Lansing Bennett Forest is one of Duxbury's many conservation areas. It was named for Dr. Lansing Bennett who was the chairman of the Duxbury Conservation Commission from 1967 to 1979.

The forest's 344 acres host about 4 miles of trails including a section of the 200 mile long Bay Circuit Trail.

The trails are for the most part smooth and open. There is one steep hill and one section along Phillips Brook, near an old trout hatchery, that can be muddy in the springtime. Most of this mud however, has been covered by boardwalks.

 

The trails, with the exception of the Bay Circuit Trail, which is a through trail, form a loop. A few side trails lead out to nearby streets.

 

The trails have directional markers, in different colors, but it won't take you very long to explore the whole area.
Following the Bay Circuit Trail in either direction can extend your ride almost endlessly.

 

There are two good places to park. My favorite is at Osborn's Country Store on Route 53. A trailhead for the Bay Circuit Trail and the Lansing Bennett Forest is right across the street. Alternatively you can park in the forest's main parking area. A few hundred yards south of the store turn left on Cross Street. Then take your next left on Union Bridge Road and continue until you see a parking area on your left. There is limited parking there, but there is a kiosk that normally has maps of the property.

I don't consider Lansing Bennett to be a "riding destination" it's too small for that. But it does contain some very pleasant trails that I utilize on much longer rides in the area.

Lansing Bennett would be a good place to introduce new riders to the sport, and a refreshing interlude if you're exploring the Bay Circuit Trail.

Directions:
From the north or south: From Route 3 take exit 10, Route 3A in Kingston. Head South and turn right on Route 53. Go about 4 miles and you'll see Osborn's Country Store on your left.

Cautions:
You may see people out jogging on these trails. Also, many people walk their dogs here.

By Bill Boles Read more about Lansing Bennet Forest

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Southeast MA

F. Gilbert Hills State Forest

58 Mill St
Foxboro  Massachusetts  02035
United States

508 543-5850

Easy

35%

Moderate

35%

Difficult

30%

Description

The Foxboro section of the F. Gilbert Hills State Forest in Foxboro, Massachusetts offers one of the best riding experiences in eastern Massachusetts. The 810 acres of woodlands are densely forested with a variety of hardwood stands and contain a spaghetti-like maze of trails. The rocky gravelly earth, derived from a glacial till, is well drained, rarely muddy, and has little sand. Drumlins provide an interesting variety of abrupt elevation changes. There are no paved roads, campsites, or lakes. With the exception of a small picnic area, this forest is basically just trails.


A number of interesting stone structures are found in the forest. Scientists and historians disagree as to their origins.

Foxboro State Forest abuts Foxborough town conservation land. Some of the trails in the forest enter this area and bicycles are welcome there. This area has seen years of off-road motorcycle activity. The trails range from rough dirt roads and degraded jeep roads to miles upon miles of difficult singletrack. The trails take advantage of the best of the forest's elevation changes, scenery and natural terrain. They are a gas to ride. The dense woods provide a shady, usually dust free riding experience. There is little mud after April, and it's cool under the trees in all but the hottest part of the summer. Here you will find the challenges of the Blue Hills or the Middlesex Fells without the air pollution and the constant traffic noise.
 

Deadfalls can be a problem in the early spring and after a summer windstorm. Fortunately the forest's many trail users join together to speed their removal.


As a result of a GOALS planning process, an extensive network of marked trails exists in the forest. Designations include trails for hikers, horses, mountain bikes, and motorcycles. With the exception of small sections of the hiking trail we are welcome on all of the forest's marked trails as well as the other woods roads, singletracks etc...

The Foxboro State Forest mountain bike trail expands upon the existing motorcycle trail. It starts out easy and then gets progressively harder until just before the end when it terminates with a 3/4 mile dirt road ride. It's 9 miles long. There is also a shortcut. "The Family Loop", leads back to headquarters after 2.5 miles.

All of the above mentioned trails are marked and copies of the DCR's forest map are available at forest headquarters.

The F. Gilbert Hills State Forest is divided up into three sections, Foxboro, Wrentham and Franklin. Locals refer to each section by the name of the town that it's in, rather than its formal name. Of the three, I feel that Wrentham has the most technical challenge, Foxboro has the most people, and Franklin is the least utilized.

Map:
The DCR publishes a map of the Foxboro section of the park. Copies are available at the signboard at forest headquarters. A copy of the DCR map is also available online. The ride on the MTB loop may be extended by turning right on Messenger Rd. at point 11 on the map, taking a left onto the Warner Trail, proceeding North, then West, then South, and returning to the multi-use trail back at Messager Rd. just Southwest of point 11.

Directions:
To get there, take exit 14 from Mass. Route 495.
Head north on Route 1 to your second intersection, Thurston Street.
From there follow the state forest signs to forest headquarters or park at either of the two metal state forest gates that will be on your left.


Fair warning... the parking lot at forest headquarters is usually filled on weekends. It's best to try and park somewhere else. Another good place to park, and the site of the future main parking lot for the forest, is about another 1/2 mile north of Thurston Street on Route 1. Just after Myrtle Street on your left look for a small paved road on your right. This is High Rock Road. The new parking area will be located right near Route 1. You can park there now or you can follow High Rock Road to the top of the hill where there is a large parking area near a communications tower. By parking here you will avoid the dirt road section that returns you to forest headquarters, and also most of the forest's other trail users. High Rock Road is also a much better place to park on weekends, mornings and evenings when the gate at forest headquarters will be locked.

Rules:
You will be sharing the trails in this forest with many other trail users. Be sure to yied the right of way to hikers and especially equestrians.
Expect hunting in the late fall and early winter. Except on Sundays, there is no hunting in Massachusetts on Sunday.

By Bill Boles Read more about F. Gilbert Hills State Forest

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Southeast MA

Freetown -Fall River State Forest

800 Slab Bridge Rd
Assonet  Massachusetts  02702
United States

508 644-5522

Easy

35%

Moderate

25%

Difficult

40%

Description

This article was written over 15 years ago. Little has changed since then save that an insect infestation has decimated the hardwood tree population.  You'll see MANY dead trees in the forest and there are frequent deadfalls on the trails.  You can help by carrying a small folding saw with you when you ride or by reporting large deadfalls to the Forest's staff. I am always impressed when riding here at how diffrent the riding is. There are very few smooth buffed trails to ride on. Instead you are continually challenged by an almost unending series of roots and small stones. Don't get me wrong, the trails are fun, but they are challenging and you can't relax. Parts of the motorcycle trail, as mentioned below, have long sections where you'll have to walk. If you spend a few days exploring the Freetown Fall River State Forest you'll put together your own "best routes to ride". And you'll have a great time doing it.

      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Freetown/Fall River State Forest is located mostly in the town of Freetown Massachusetts. The 6550 acre forest has been a Mecca for area mountain bikers since the sport began.

The stoney gravelly soil drains quickly and does not promote the formation of bogs or mudholes. After a rainstorm there is a lot of water in the forest but in most cases you can drive right through it on a firm bottom.

An extensive network of somewhat degraded dirt roads sees a lot of use from motorized vehicles, very little from horses and seasonal use by snowmobilers and nordic skiers. This is one of the few places in Southeastern Massachusetts where you'll find dogsleds. In all but the warmest weather the dogs will be barking around the forest as they train for the winter dogsled season. You may also come across hunting dog trials. If you do, you'll see small groups of dogs running through the forest with numbers painted on their sides and wireless transmitters on their collars.

What brings all these people to F/FR? It's the trails. They're wonderful. They go everywhere. You can get big time lost. You can be out in the woods all by yourself. You can explore to your heart's content. Even hammerheads are happy here. Wow!

As always, trail courtesy demands that we stop for oncoming horses. When overtaking horses we make verbal contact first, and only pass at the equestrians direction. We never overtake walkers without giving them advanced verbal notice and even then we pass going only slightly faster than they are. The crowded nature of the F/FR trails demands our best behavior.

This is a very remote area. You will need to pick up a map and some directions at the ranger station. Non trail activity in the forest consists of a small picnic area at forest headquarters that has an in-season spalsh deck, and hunting season.

GOALS (Guidelines For Operation And Land Stewardship) planning, expanded the the existing trail system. The 22 mile motorcycle trail, which was about 50% on dirt roads, was moved off graded surfaces almost entirely. There is an expanded hiking trail network, a dogsled trail, a horse trail and a snowmobile trail. This was also one of the first DEM areas to have an official mountain bike trail. The trail, which is 11 miles long is aimed at the beginner/novice rider. It starts at forest headquarters and loops around on some old dirt roads and doubletracks. It's a very pleasant, though non-challenging ride that expands slightly upon the dogsled trail. More experienced riders are encouraged to venture into the remoter areas of the forest. They will, for instance, be able to ride upon the almost endless singletracks that make up the new motorcycle trail. (A 22 mile long singletrack? Come on? You gotta be kidding!)

And speaking of the singletracks, many are VERY difficult to ride. One that I'm thinking of as I write this consists of a mile plus long section of exposed stones with very little dirt between them. The motorcycle trail in particular has many miles of difficult trails. But, while there a lot of difficllt trails in the Freetown/ Fall River State Forest. Ther are quite a few very mellow singletracks too.  You'll just have to explore to find them.

One negative of this area is mosquitos. On evening rides during the bug season you'll have extra encouragement to keep moving. (Mosquitos rarely bite moving bicyclists.) A good mosquito repellant, or one of those electronic bug-aways helps a lot.

Directions:

To get there leave route 24 at exit 10 in Assonet. Head towards Freetown, and follow the state forest signs into the forest.

By Bill Boles Read more about Freetown -Fall River State Forest

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Southeast MA

Dighton Rock State Park

93 Bayview Ave
Berkley  Massachusetts  02779
United States

508 822-7537

Easy

95%

Moderate

4%

Difficult

1%

Description

It says on the DCR's website that the Dighton Rock State Park has mountain biking. And it does, sort of. The 85-acre park has about 2 miles of trails. They are flat and except for an occasional root poking through the ground, very smooth. Most of the trails are wide enough for two people to walk side by side, and the only singletracks quickly lead out of the park.


All that being said, Dighton Rock State Park would be a lot of fun for families with young kids. Dighton Rock's very flat trails lend themselves to singlespeed or BMX bikes with small wheels. And the 2 miles of trails shouldn't be too much for most kids.


Dighton Rock has a nice picnic area, and a good view of the Taunton River. It is close to Route 24 and it's a pleasant place to visit and to relax in. Quite a contrast to the nearby Freetown-Fall River State Forest.

As an added bonus there is a museum that displays "Dighton Rock" a flat sided boulder that once rested near the shore of the Taunton River. The rock is covered with petroglyphs, carved designs, which many feel predate Columbus and indicate early European visitors to the area.


Directions
From route 24 take exit 10 turn right at the end of the exit ramp and follow the signs.


Cautions
Expect to find pedestrians, kids and slow moving dogs in this area. Especially on weekends.

By Bill Boles Read more about Dighton Rock State Park

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