Central MA

Wachusett NEMBA Chapter Ride & Meeting

Event Date

9/8/14 6:00pm to 9:00pm

Meet at the Wachusett Village Inn. Ride starts promptly at 6 PM. The meeting will be held in the restaurant at 7:15 PM.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Wachusett+Village+Inn&ll=42.545066,-71.879017&spn=0.0089,0.013368&sll=42.543085,-71.879058 Read more about Wachusett NEMBA Chapter Ride & Meeting

Location

Wachusett Village Inn

Region

Chapter

Wachusett

State

Massachusetts

Ride Level

All Levels

Ride Style

XC

Ride Leader Name

Eric Boudreau

Wachusett NEMBA Women's Ride

Event Date

4/11/17 (All day) to 6/27/17 (All day)

Wachusett NEMBA will be hosting a Ladies Ride at the Leominster State Forest on Tuesday evenings in April, May and June.

The ride initially will start @ 5:00 PM and then shift to 5:30 as the evening's daylight increases.

Given the varied terrain at LSF, this ride isn’t for beginners. It's more a sport level ride, with more single track than dirt roads.

This will always be a no-drop ride. Please call me with questions regarding level of riding, the terrain, trails or conditions.

We'll meet at the dirt parking lot at 71 Rocky Pond Rd in Princeton.  (That's about a half mile south of Leominster's main parking lot.)

  Read more about Wachusett NEMBA Women's Ride

Location

Leominster State Forest

Region

Chapter

Wachusett

State

Massachusetts

Ride Level

Advanced-novice
Intermediate
Advanced-intermediate

Ride Style

XC

Ride Leader Name

Lydia Barter
774-249-0705

Wachusett NEMBA Chapter Meeting

Date

1/25/17 (All day)

Wachusett NEMBA wil be having a chapter meeting at 7:00 PM on Wednesday January 25th at Ladds Restaurant which is located at 64 Barre Paxton Rd in Rutland.

Come meet local riders and volunteers and catch up on what's going on in our area. Help make plans for 2017.

Talk Mountain Bikes!!!

Please RSVP to the event on the Facebook page so that we can give the restaurant a heads up.

Email me if you have any questions. Read more about Wachusett NEMBA Chapter Meeting

Location

Rutland, MA

Event Leader

Brett Russ
bruss@alum.wpi.edu

QC NEMBA Winter Women's Clinics

Event Date

Repeats every week every Wednesday until Wed Mar 29 2017 .
1/25/17 6:30pm to 8:30pm

OK ladies, in efforts to stay connected to each other and our bikes during the winter months, the chapter in conjunction with Danielson Adventure Sports at 21 Furnace St. Danielson, CT has set up a series of weekly women's clinics.

Many of these will be hands-on clinics, so be sure to check each week's event post for details regarding that week's clinic topic and what you will need to bring.

More information and discussion is on this Facebook Page.

BYO refreshements!

1/25 - Bike cleaning & safety check
2/1 - Nutritional Supplements
2/8 - Winter Riding Gear Must Haves
2/15 - Strength Training & Stretching
2/22 - Suspension setup 
3/1 - What's in your pack - Essential items 
3/8 - Rollers v Trainers 
3/15 - Tire Maintenance & Repairs (tubes and tubeless)
3/22 - Emergency Fixes to get you out of the woods
3/29 - Grand Finale Special Read more about QC NEMBA Winter Women's Clinics

Location

Danielson Adventure Sports

Region

Chapter

Quiet Corner
Rhode Island

State

Connecticut

Ride Style

XC

Ride Leader Name

Stacey Jimenez
860-230-1237

Mountain Biking not Harmful to Watershed Land

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Mountain biking not harmful to watershed land

Brett Russ
Vice President Wachusett Chapter New England Mountain Bike Association
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MWRA Advisory Board Joe Favaloro’s recent fear-mongering propaganda in various media outlets (http://mwraadvisoryboard.com/concerns-over-mountain-biking/) portrays mountain bikers as destructive criminals who, if permitted to ride bicycles on trails in the vast watershed lands of central Massachusetts, would soon degrade Boston’s pristine water to that found in Flint, MI. The ignorance of his op-ed is equalled only by the hypocrisies of reality.

Living in central Massachusetts means being surrounded by more than 100,000 acres of watershed land owned by us, the Commonwealth’s citizens. This land is foremost the water supply for the residents in greater Boston but lucrative extraction of natural resources and some recreation are also allowed. There is constant logging in the watershed and it is easy to find evidence of oil spills, trash, deep muddy ruts, and extensive collateral damage to the remaining trees. There are bulldozed road drainage ditches into watershed wetlands, clear violations of laws. There’s evidence of toxic illegal dumping sites left for years along watershed roads near tributaries. A large and eroded gravel pit sits mere feet from water on a Quabbin peninsula.

Walkers, permitted nearly everywhere, let dogs swim in critical watershed intake zones. And powerboats are allowed on the Quabbin Reservoir among other watershed lakes.

Favaloro ignores all of this but speculates that mountain biking poses the greatest threat to water purity. Favaloro ignores the scientific literature that attests that the physical impacts of mountain biking are similar to that of hiking, even though the Department of Conservation & Recreation that oversees the Division of Water Supply Protection (DWSP) has reviewed and agrees with these conclusions. Favaloro, the MWRA, and the DWSP have no factual basis to make these claims.

Favaloro fears that allowing mountain biking is a slippery slope that could lead to allowing snowmobiles, horseback riding, and swimming. But he seems to be unaware that all of those activities are already permitted within the Ware River Watershed.. He suggests that mountain biking could spread to the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed, but doesn’t realize that there have been legal mountain bike trails there since 2001.

Overall, Mr Favaloro’s opinion, while widely publicized, is factually inaccurate and fails to consider the needs of area residents. That he is in a position of authority in our water management system is extremely concerning.

The DWSP is mandated to allow environmentally sustainable recreation to the Ware River Watershed and for decades mountain biking has co-existed on the more than 35-miles of trails there. During this time, the MWRA’s own reports indicate that water quality has increased, not decreased, and this fact alone highlights the error in Favaloro’s claims.. Mountain bikers are a responsible user-group that play an important role in stewarding trails and open spaces. Hiking, XC skiing, hunting, fishing, horseback riding, and mountain biking should all be possible in the watershed; there’s no reason for just mountain biking to be excluded.

Local residents now feel that they are living in a police state. Trails used for decades by walkers, equestrians and cyclists have been closed to everyone by hundreds of signs and state cut trees. Hidden spy cameras abound. Watershed rangers photograph you and your license plate to look up your address and create a list of everyone on this public land. Keeping people off trails that have been in use for decades with no effect on water quality is suddenly the top priority despite 15 years of water quality reports never even identifying recreation as a cause of poor test results, much less mountain biking.

The DWSP should partner with the local residents to fix or close the trails that could erode and use factual analysis to allow shared non-motorized trail use. Together we could improve the recreational experience of all of local residents while at the same time ensuring that the resource is protected. This is what the New England Mountain Bike Association, the Friends of the Ware River Watershed, and I have offered from the start. But we’ve been soundly and repeatedly told to go away. One can only hope that fear-mongering and misinformation attacks will cease. That common sense will prevail and that we can all work together to achieve the goals of protecting this resource and the recreational experience of local residents.

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Click this link for NEMBA's solutions to the issue of mountain biking on Ware River Watershed Land. Read more about Mountain Biking not Harmful to Watershed Land

NEMBA & DCR Partner to Open 15-mile Singletrack Trail Network at Dubuque State Forest

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

(HAWLEY, MASS.) – The Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and the Pioneer Valley Chapter of the New England Mountain Bike Association (NEMBA) announce a partnership to open a 15-mile network of single-track trails at Dubuque State Forest.
 
“Dubuque’s single-track trails wind through gorgeous and diverse woodlands and offer a variety of challenges, loops and scenic features that mountain bikers seek,” says Harold Green, President of the PV-NEMBA Chapter. “But these trails will also provide new opportunities for cross-country skiers, hikers and trail runners as well.”
 
Before approving this trail network, the DCR carefully assessed each trail to ensure that the network would protect important natural and culture resources, but also provide excellent recreational experiences to a variety of users. 
 
PV-NEMBA has agreed to organize volunteer trail maintenance and stewardship of the new trail system, help monitor against illegal trail building and work to educate trail users about etiquette and stewardship.
 
We are very excited about this partnership to expand recreational opportunities at Dubuque,” said DCR Commissioner, Leo P. Roy.  “We expect that this new trail network will draw users from both the Pioneer Valley and Berkshire County to Hawley, and we believe that excellent trail networks and recreation can have economic benefits to local communities and the region. “
 
DCR and NEMBA are currently working to install signs, create new on-line maps, and build some additional trail connections. Read more about NEMBA & DCR Partner to Open 15-mile Singletrack Trail Network at Dubuque State Forest

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