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where do i find good bridge lumber?

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  • where do i find good bridge lumber?

    like the 2 1/2" - 3" thick by 12" used on Friends Trail, Borderland for example. i think the supports are 8x10 block...

  • #2
    Go to a saw mill lumber yard (NOT Home Depot or Lowes). That said, is pressure treated lumber not sufficient for what you're building?
    In some mysterious way woods have never seemed to me to be static things. In physical terms, I move through them; yet in metaphysical ones, they seem to move through me.
    John Fowles

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    • #3
      thanks, i will try and find one around me. just trying to keep it as simple as possible. want to build a bridge over a bog in my back yard to get to rest of my property and some trails (for walking the dogs). i liked the strength of the lumber used at Borderland. a 12' long section with no middle supports barely sags with me (260+lbs) on it.

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      • #4
        Hey No Skills, the Friends bridges are 2X12 PT lumber (used for both the beam and & the top deck), with 14" X 14" blocks at either end for footings. The 14X14 blocks were cut from pressure treated timbers (they were donated by a big-dig contractor). One of my better bridge designs in B'land.
        "Everyone I know in bicycling is at least a little bit crazy, present company included." Sheldon Brown

        semass

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        • #5
          Originally posted by C.P. View Post
          Hey No Skills, the Friends bridges are 2X12 PT lumber (used for both the beam and & the top deck), with 14" X 14" blocks at either end for footings. The 14X14 blocks were cut from pressure treated timbers (they were donated by a big-dig contractor). One of my better bridge designs in B'land.
          Thanks CP. A little surprised to hear they are just 2x12 pressure treated. I measured the thickness the other day and they were well over 2" thick. Would have thought 2x12 would be 1 3/4" thick, at most. Maybe they were bloated I'm going to use cut up stumps for some of the footings, will probably need to find some timber blocks though.

          Thanks again for the info.

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          • #6
            You can get full 2" rough PT at A&B Lumber Pembroke NH. But easiest for you might be stringer/decking method (ladder bridge) with regular lumber-yard PT if you need the 12' support spacing.

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            • #7
              thanks, trying to avoid stringer/decking method due to the length of the bridge, trying to keep simple.

              CP, do you know where that 2x12 PT came from? local? National Lumber in Mansfield couldnt help.
              Last edited by noskills; February 5th, 2013, 10:58 AM.

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              • #8
                I'm pretty sure I got it from Fernandes lumber yard in Easton. The rough cut PT digger mentioned would be even better, but it is typically not stocked down in our area.
                "Everyone I know in bicycling is at least a little bit crazy, present company included." Sheldon Brown

                semass

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the info everyone

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                  • #10
                    If you are looking to put a bridge on State Park land I would check with the local Boy Scouts, they make a lot of the bridges for the SPs. I know this because some friends and I spent our hard earned money to built a well thought out safe, wide and secure bridge in a local SP only to have it ripped out a year later for a new bridge built by the local Boy Scouts. I appreciate the work that they do but if i was going to do it again, i'd check with them so we didn't waste our time and money on a bridge that they had all ready planned to build. We could have used our lumber to fix a different area.

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                    • #11
                      Or - you could check with the State Park managers (since it's their land to manage), and see if they have bridge standards you need to follow, find out if someone else has already signed up to do that work, and/or get approval to construct anything on their land before you start...

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                      • #12
                        Looks like he owns the property.....

                        Originally posted by noskills View Post
                        want to build a bridge over a bog in my back yard to get to rest of my property and some trails (for walking the dogs).

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by noskills View Post
                          I'm going to use cut up stumps for some of the footings

                          Thanks again for the info.
                          Use cedar stumps if possible...
                          If you worried about falling off the bike, you'd never get on.--Lance Armstrong

                          http://www.semassnemba.org
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                          email:SteveC@semassnemba.org

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