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  • Studded Tire Recommendations

    Anyone have any recommendations on studded tires? Thinking about attempting to get into winter riding this year. I don't want to go crazy expensive because I'm not sure if I'm going to stick with this.

    Also, do studded tires really make that big of a difference riding in snow? Or are they really only helpful on ice?

  • #2
    They only help for ice not on snow. There's some discussion on whether or a wide or narrow tire is better for snow (i.e. float on top or cut through) Personally I like a wide tire, but its really dependent on the snow.

    Anyway, I have a set of home made studded tires, they're heavier than the commercial versions. On a really icy day in the woods or on a frozen lake its so much fun, its criminal. Making a set is time consuming, I have made 2 sets, so I've made my mistakes and can help you out if you want to go down that road.

    Now is it worth $100 a tire (generally Nokians are considered the best ones out there) for that? I dunno. Those tires will last a long time though, like 5 years or more. I can tell you that if you don't like it, you will have no problem selling them.

    John
    Last edited by Jisch; December 12th, 2007, 10:09 PM.
    Big Strings, Big Wheels, The Jisch Blog

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    • #3
      I love my Nokian 294's since I got them. They work great on the icy stuff and are agressive enough for the light snow and such too. And like J said, especially early in the season you will be able to sell them if you bag it pretty easily. Ebay has a few sets for about 160 new.

      Good luck and have fun!!

      Mike

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      • #4
        Nokian Extreme 294's are great. I've had the 296's for years now and they work great. Important that you seat the studs on a paved surface for a least 10 miles. The Extremes have a very good tread design for non-icy surfaces also. The problem with home made is they loose the studs easier. Nokians don't come cheap but resale is easy because they're the best.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ridge Rider 79 View Post
          Anyone have any recommendations on studded tires? Thinking about attempting to get into winter riding this year. I don't want to go crazy expensive because I'm not sure if I'm going to stick with this.

          Also, do studded tires really make that big of a difference riding in snow? Or are they really only helpful on ice?

          If you visit www.universalcycles.com they have a good variety of studded tires. But I have to agree that the Nokians have the best rating and you get what you pay for.

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          • #6
            I have a set of nokian 296's They are awesome. before that I got a set of IRC Sno-Mads off of ebay for $60 ( 260 Studs per tire ) they were good , but not as good as the Nokians.

            when and if you get a set , go to the nearest skating pond and have fun!! it is a blast!

            Originally posted by bikerdom View Post
            The problem with home made is they loose the studs easier.
            I don't know about that . I have a set of Home made, ( using 110 sheet metal screws per tire ) and I have not lost one, and to lose a stud would mean ripping it through the tire and I really don't see that happening
            That is the last time I follow someone called "Splat" through a mud puddle. Bad omen.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dabedob View Post
              ...I have to agree that the Nokians have the best rating and you get what you pay for.
              Carbide studs are pretty key. Steel studs will dull out relatively quickly if you ride on any pavement or rock, which seems inevitable.
              <a href="http://wmnemba.wordpress.com/">White Mountains NEMBA</a>

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              • #8
                Several years ago I bought a couple of studded tires from Bike Nashbar for about 30 to 40 dollars each. I don't remember exactly right now. I have ridden on icy ponds with them and have never gone down. So you can spend more for studded tires but there are some deals out there.
                "I'll watch some TV, it'll help me to RELAX!" - Ren Hoek

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                • #9
                  I've never run studded tires, and have ridden through every winter for 18 years. There have been maybe five occasions in that whole time that I missed the studs. By far, most of the time, I have to listen to my ride buds complain that they didn't need the studs and it was a mistake to use them.

                  They have a big downside - weight, right where you want it least, in the rotating mass. The other downside is in some conditions, where they cut through crust you'd otherwise be happily riding over.

                  If you buy them, expect to need them less than twice per year, and most likely not even that.

                  Slider

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Slider View Post
                    I've never run studded tires, and have ridden through every winter for 18 years. There have been maybe five occasions in that whole time that I missed the studs. By far, most of the time, I have to listen to my ride buds complain that they didn't need the studs and it was a mistake to use them.

                    They have a big downside - weight, right where you want it least, in the rotating mass. The other downside is in some conditions, where they cut through crust you'd otherwise be happily riding over.

                    If you buy them, expect to need them less than twice per year, and most likely not even that.

                    Slider
                    studded tires do not break through the crust any more than regular tires. if it's gonna break it's gonna break.


                    the upside of studded tires is seeking out and riding glare ice. nothing better than riding far out on spy pond or concord river or doing laps and having lots of control. or bombing things like the PR and encountering 40 feet if the bridge-too-far glacier. no studs, you are walking that, and having a hard time. studs, ride as though it was summer.
                    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Goodbye,
                    (4S,4aR,5S,5aR,6R,12aS)-4-(dimethylamino)- 3,5,10,12,12a-pentahydroxy- 6-methyl- 1,11-dioxo- 1,4,4a,5,5a,6,11,12a-octahydrotetracene- 2-carboxamide.
                    You won't be missed.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hogboy View Post
                      studded tires do not break through the crust any more than regular tires. if it's gonna break it's gonna break.


                      the upside of studded tires is seeking out and riding glare ice. nothing better than riding far out on spy pond or concord river or doing laps and having lots of control. or bombing things like the PR and encountering 40 feet if the bridge-too-far glacier. no studs, you are walking that, and having a hard time. studs, ride as though it was summer.
                      Sounds like somebody wants to do some snow riding in the PR!

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                      • #12
                        I've heard that the Nokians are the best but also quite pricey. I was mostly thinking of riding some packed down snowmobile trails and not so much soft snow. I'm guessing that I won't encounter a whole lot of ice on that type of terrain but I dunno?

                        I may be better off getting a fatter set of tires instead.

                        Thanx for the suggestions.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          nokians are pricey but they will last an extremely long time. no matter what you get, make sure it has carbide studs. any old stud will wear out, but carbide lasts the longest. it will outlive the rubber on the tire. I have ancient nokian 296's and they still work awesome. riding on pavement doesn't seem to affect them at all
                          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Goodbye,
                          (4S,4aR,5S,5aR,6R,12aS)-4-(dimethylamino)- 3,5,10,12,12a-pentahydroxy- 6-methyl- 1,11-dioxo- 1,4,4a,5,5a,6,11,12a-octahydrotetracene- 2-carboxamide.
                          You won't be missed.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Also if you lock up your rear brake on the driveway with them and there is no ice , you will leave permanent marks in your driveway.
                            That is the last time I follow someone called "Splat" through a mud puddle. Bad omen.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ridge Rider 79 View Post
                              I've heard that the Nokians are the best but also quite pricey. I was mostly thinking of riding some packed down snowmobile trails and not so much soft snow. I'm guessing that I won't encounter a whole lot of ice on that type of terrain but I dunno?

                              I may be better off getting a fatter set of tires instead.

                              Thanx for the suggestions.
                              Ridge,

                              Depends where and when you ride-if you rode the plains earlier this week-studs would not have been optional. But if you ride tonight in the coke plant, deerfield, toby etc you'd want wider non-studded tires run at a very low air pressure (like 20 psi-don't worry-you won't flat-13 inches of snow has a way of taking the sharp edges off a trail).

                              I'm with splat on this-over the last 5 years of snow riding-there has only been 5-6 days where studs would have been a life-saver. But by and large, wide, soft and floaty was the better call. I did have have a set of schwalbe ice-spikers for a season-but once the snow got deep, or worse, soft and grabby they were a nightmare (and they weighed like 950 grams for a 1.9 inch tire!).

                              If you do get a set of studs-just be prepared to switch them on and off your wheels as conditions demand (afterall-changing tires isn't all that hard esp if you're running tubes)--that's the solution I always toy with.

                              The Nokians are superior though I understand Schwalbe now makes a lighter version of the ice spiker with carbide studs. I'm really interested in using the nokian Freddy's Revenge Lite (a 2.3) studded tire-might run the gammut of good tire choice. There is a studded nokian folding bead that weighs under 700 grams as well.

                              Tough call-but most people in these parts run regular tires and do fine-the extra hip-saving security of studded tires certainly makes some sense too.
                              Liam

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